Wednesday, 30 Sep 2020

Tips To Improve Your Travel Photos

You may have noticed that we love taking travel pictures. We believe that photography has the power to eternalize moments, arouse curiosity and inspire people. With that in mind, we have prepared a list of four tips to improve your travel photos. Let’s check it out!

  1. Pay Attention To The Composition

There is a basic rule of photography composition that will completely change the way you register the world through the lens of your camera (or cell phone), called the rule of thirds.

The eye naturally looks for points of interest in the image, and if you follow this tip, you will have more harmonious travel photos.

How do you apply this? When looking at the screen of your camera (or viewfinder), mentally divide it into three columns and three lines, as in a tic-tac-toe game. The object to be photographed must be occupying one of these points of intersection, the one you find most interesting.

  1. Background

Nobody wants to be cut off in the trip photos, right? You can’t cut the tourist spot or the landscape either. That is why framing requires your attention.

When photographing a person, make sure the camera fully frames them. Avoid leaving your feet, arms or other body parts out. If you want to take the whole body, sometimes taking a step back will solve the problem.

  1. Unleash Creativity

Using your imagination and creating unusual angles can generate an incredible photo. For this, anything goes: to lower, jump, move away from the object, create an optical illusion, play of light and shadow, etc. Everything that your creativity allows. For more details on this, go to https://photolemur.com/blog/15-classes-workshops-travel-photography.

  1. Look For A Well-Lit Place

The best times to shoot are at dawn and dusk when the sunlight is softer, and the sky turns into a profusion of colors. At that moment, you will find natural and warmer light, which makes the photos with a special touch.

During the day, especially at noon, the sun creates harsh shadows, which can complicate its composition. For example: when photographing a person with a cap, the shadow will be on only part of their face, which will be very strange.

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